Three Reasons to Choose Film Over Digital Photography

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Image: petapixel.com

The owner of Ben Perlin photography, Benjamin Perlin is a professional photographer. Though Benjamin Perlin uses a digital camera at times, he owns four film cameras and greatly prefers film photography to digital.

While photography has been digital for over 20 years now, many photographers still prefer shooting with film. Here are three of the reasons why.

1. Quality – Despite all the features offered along with the premium price tags you see on digital cameras, they still have trouble keeping up with the quality of standard 35mm film. In one test, a photographer found his old 1950s Kodak film camera actually had higher resolution than his state-of-the-art, $5,000 DSLR camera.

2. Cost – As mentioned above, a high-quality digital camera can cost thousands of dollars. Shooting with film does mean reoccurring and continual costs, but these outlays are still a fraction of the cost to buy a quality digital camera. With the move to digital, film camera prices have gone way down, meaning you could quite a bargain.

3. Care – A digital camera’s often-massive storage bank enables a photographer to take 15 similar shots looking for that one perfect picture. Film photographers, on the other hand, have to be more careful. Instead of storage space for 10,000 pictures, their rolls of film typically comes with about 24 exposures. While some might see this as a serious disadvantage, other photographers actually prefer it, as it makes them think critically and take a more methodical approach to their work.

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